The other day, I found a cool project by a M.I.T. Media Lab student on nytimes.com. It’s called Ambient Addition by Noah Vawter, consists of two headphones with transparent earpieces, each equipped with a microphone and a speaker. The microphones sample the background noise in the immediate vicinity — wind blowing through the trees, traffic, a cellphone conversation. Then, with the help of a small digital signal-processing chip, the headphones make music from these sounds. For instance, percussive sounds like footsteps and coughs are sequenced into a stuttering pattern, and all the noises are tuned so that they fuse into a coherent, slowly changing set of harmonies. (from NYTimes.com)   Here is link to read more

Many of you might say, so what?  I have watched so many those “so what?” kind of projects for last 10 years in interactive technology field, even this environmental sound mixer was refreshing enough to grab my attention.  Nowadays, you often see at music performance where they sample and mix the sound live and from old days, muscians tried to imitate sounds from nature.  I thought it might be interesting if someone record music that is sampled and composed via this Ambient Walkman in different locations such as rainforest in Amazon jungle or the Arctic.